Figures show that nationally, pupils who are eligible for free school meals (FSM) underachieve considerably compared to their non-FSM peers at every key stage in their education.

The Government therefore believes it is right that additional funds are available to give the poorest children who achieve less well a better start in life.

It is for the school to decide how to spend this additional funding. However, we are held accountable for how we have used the money to support our children from low income families and we are required to publish online information about how we have used the Premium. The information below clearly states how this money has been spent since 2011.

How we used our Pupil Premium funding for 2016-2017 (£83,740)

We know the strategies we have employed over the last five years have made a significant difference not only to the educational outcomes of our children in receipt of Pupil Premium but also their social and emotional well-being as evidenced by progress and attainment data, increased attendance figures and participation in the wider life/activities of the school.

How we spent our 2016-2017 funding:

  • A part-time qualified teacher up until Easter 2017 and level three support staff gave additional language and learning support to children with EAL and/or SEN and who also qualify for the Premium so that their significant needs were more appropriately met and outcomes improved. In addition, the continued use of the WellComm Language and Little Bridge IT programmes better supported teachers and children in the teaching and learning of basic English.
  • In Foundation stage and key stage 1, we funded additional quality first teaching and timely interventions, lead and managed by additional teachers and a HLTA, to ensure early reading, writing and mathematical skills were secured for all groups of children in receipt of the Premium so that attainment gaps are narrowed earlier
  • We provided extra-curricular activities, including gifted and talented provision, and ensured these were available for and accessed by Pupil Premium children
  • We continued the ‘Better Readers’ Project’ in key stage 2 to accelerate reading progress
  • We used 1- to-1 tuition for targeted pupils to accelerate pupil progress in maths in year six
  • The school’s deputy head teacher was deployed to support our ‘borderline’ mathematicians to make sure they made expected progress, most of these were pupil premium children
  • Purchase of the ‘Grammar Hammer’ scheme for grammar helped teachers to better identify gaps in children’s learning to ensure timely and appropriate interventions were put in place to close these gaps. Improved results in grammar spelling and punctuation in year six for disadvantaged children evidenced the effectiveness of the assertive mentoring programme.
  • We funded curriculum focused and culturally rich off-site school visits for all disadvantaged pupils including out of school activities that supported and promoted engagement and delight in learning. This has ensured equality of opportunity, so no child has been discriminated against as a result of financial disadvantage
  • We held pupil progress meetings each term to review the progress of all children in receipt of FSM/Ever6 and the efficacy of our strategies and interventions, so that we ensured they all remained on track to achieve/exceed their academic targets
  • Purchased of new maths resources had particular impact in year six.

2015 – 2016 and 2016-2017 more challenging age related expectations and new accountability measures

With the introduction of the 2014 national curriculum and the new end of key stage tests in May 2016, comparisons in performance are not possible and the DfE have made it clear that schools should not compare these last assessment data with previous years. Our data shows that the majority of our disadvantaged children did not attain as well as their non-disadvantaged peers. However, the new value added progress measures show that our disadvantaged pupils made better progress than non-disadvantaged pupils in 2016 and in some areas of the curriculum in 2017 (see information below), evidencing the effective use and positive impact of our pupil premium funding on pupil outcomes.

Children at the end of key stage 1 and 2 were tested very differently this year and last, where age related expectations were significantly higher than in years before 2016. The majority of children found the new tests very challenging and our data reflects national attainment figures for all groups of children in being lower than those in previous years.

Our success in closing attainment gaps up until 2015 have been largely wiped away by the government’s significantly higher expectations and different accountability measures. Our school improvement plans for 2016/18 remain firmly focused on raising standards in English and maths for each child, irrespective of the disadvantages she or he may face.

IMPACT – the difference this additional money made to the learning outcomes for children in receipt of Pupil Premium:

  • All children in receipt of funding, including the more able, were targeted for additional educational provision
  • Reception: the children who are now ‘pupil premium’ made more progress than the rest in reading writing and maths, with 50% getting a good level of development (an improvement on last year)
  • Year one phonics: Our continued focus on ensuring phonics is taught daily and in small teaching groups meant that pupil premium children who were not disadvantaged in other areas such as in language and special needs, did meet the standard in the year one phonics screening check.
  • Key stage 2 progress: overall progress across the key stage in writing and maths combined was in line with that made by non-pupil premium children; this was largely due to their improved and better progress in maths.
  • Key stage 2 attainment: more pupil premium than non-pupil premium reached ‘expected’ in grammar spelling and punctuation and around the same number of each reached ‘expected’ in maths. Our scaled scores for children who are pupil premium, with no language barriers to learning, showed attainment at least as good as the rest.
  • Key stage 1: attainment for disadvantaged children was a great improvement on that for key stage 1 in 2016.
  • All disadvantaged children participated in extra-curricular and out of school hours learning opportunities (including sports, music, dance, drama and art). Where costs were involved, these were meet by pupil premium funds enabling them to undertake these activities. Our data analysis evidences improved outcomes and attendance rates as children have involved themselves in the wider life of the school.

How we used our Pupil Premium funding for 2015-2016 (£95,588)

We know the strategies we have employed over the last four years have made a significant difference to not only the educational outcomes of our children in receipt of Pupil Premium but also their social and emotional well-being as evidenced by progress and attainment data, increased attendance figures and participation in the wider life/activities of the school.

How we spent our 2015-2016 funding:

  • A part-time qualified teacher and level three support staff gave additional language and learning support to children with EAL and/or SEN and who also qualify for the Premium so that their significant needs were more appropriately met and outcomes improved. In addition, the purchase and use of the WellComm Language Programme and Little Bridge IT program better supported teachers and children in the teaching and learning of basic English.
  • In foundation stage and key stage 1, we funded additional quality first teaching and timely interventions, lead and managed by additional teachers and a HLTA, to ensure early reading, writing and mathematical skills were secured for all groups of children in receipt of the Premium so that attainment gaps are narrowed earlier
  • We provided extra-curricular activities, including gifted and talented provision, and ensured these were available for and accessed by Pupil Premium children
  • We increased the number of targeted key stage 2 pupils undertaking the ‘Better Readers’ Project’ to accelerate reading progress
  • We used 1- to-1 tuition for targeted pupils to accelerate pupil progress in maths
  • We funded an additional experienced English teacher to work in year 6 to instigate individual and small group interventions to ensure all pupil premium children achieved /exceeded their academic targets. The school’s deputy head teacher was deployed to support our more able mathematicians.
  • Purchase of the Assertive Mentoring System for maths helped teachers to better identify gaps in children’s learning to ensure timely and appropriate interventions were put in place to close these gaps. Improved maths results across the school for disadvantaged children evidenced the effectiveness of assertive mentoring
  • We funded curriculum focused and culturally rich off-site school visits for all disadvantaged pupils including out of school activities that supported and promoted engagement and delight in learning. This has ensured equality of opportunity, so no child has been discriminated against as a result of financial disadvantage
  • We held pupil progress meetings each half term to review the progress of all children in receipt of FSM/Ever6 and the efficacy of our strategies and interventions, so that we ensured they all remained on track to achieve/exceed their academic targets.

2015 – 2016 more challenging age related expectations and new accountability measures

With the introduction of the 2014 national curriculum and the new end of key stage tests in May 2016, comparisons in performance are not possible and the DfE have made it clear that schools should not compare this year’s assessment data with previous years. Our data shows that the majority of our disadvantaged children did not attain as well as their non-disadvantaged peers. However, the new value added progress measures show that our disadvantaged pupils made better progress than non-disadvantaged pupils (see figures below), evidencing the effective use and positive impact of our pupil premium funding on pupil outcomes.

Children at the end of key stage 1 and 2 were tested very differently this year, where age related expectations were significantly higher than in previous years. The majority of children found the new tests very challenging and our data reflects national attainment figures for all groups of children in being lower than those in previous years.

Across the school, pupils in receipt of pupil premium, as a group, made similar or better progress to other children in reading, writing and maths. However, because of the significant uplift in age related expectations, across all year groups there was very little narrowing of attainment gaps. Our success in closing attainment gaps up until 2015 have been largely wiped away by the government’s significantly higher expectations and different accountability measures. Our school improvement plans for 2016/18 remain firmly focused on raising standards in English and maths for each child, irrespective of the disadvantages she or he may face.

IMPACT – the difference this additional money made to the learning outcomes for children in receipt of Pupil Premium:

  • All children in receipt of funding, including the more able, were targeted for additional educational provision to ensure at least expected progress was achieved by all these children. Our data analysis shows that our strategic decisions on how we spent the Pupil Premium had a positive impact on the achievement of this group of children and that across all classes at least expected progress for the vast majority of our Premium pupils was secured, and in maths and writing a greater percentage of pupil premium than non-pupil premium made more than the expected progress. Using additional qualified teachers and skilled support staff to work with targeted children across the school ensured we focused on improving the quality of our provision/interventions.
  • All five of our disadvantaged children in reception made better than expected progress in reading and maths, and in writing, four of the five made more than expected progress
  • Our continued focus on ensuring phonics is taught daily and in small teaching groups meant that of the ten pupil premium children, nine met the standard in the phonics screening check
  • At the end of key stage 2, overall progress in writing and maths was well above the national average for all children, with reading in line with the average progress for all children. (Progress data for pupil premium children nationally is yet to be released). Progress for school pupil premium children was better than that for non-pupil premium children, in all three subjects.
  • All disadvantaged children participated in extra-curricular and out of school hours learning opportunities (including sports, music, dance, drama and art). Where costs were involved, these were meet by pupil premium funds enabling them to undertake these activities. Our data analysis evidences improved outcomes and attendance rates as children have involved themselves in the wider life of the school.
  • Children who have no other barriers to learning other than being in receipt of pupil premium, attained at least as well as their non-disadvantaged peers.

How we used our Pupil Premium funding for 2014-2015 (£85,800)

Our Pupil Premium for 2014-15 was £85,800

We know the strategies we have employed over the last three years have made a significant difference to not only the educational outcomes of our children in receipt of Pupil Premium but also their social and emotional well-being as evidenced by progress and attainment data, increased attendance figures and participation in the wider life/activities of the school.

How we spent our 2014-2015 funding:

  • We employed a part-time qualified teacher and level three support staff to give additional language and learning support to children with EAL and/or SEN and who also qualify for the Premium so that their significant needs were more appropriately met and outcomes improved
  • In foundation stage and key stage 1, we funded additional quality first teaching and timely interventions, lead and managed by additional teachers and a HLTA, to ensure early reading, writing and mathematical skills were secured for all groups of children in receipt of the Premium so that attainment gaps are narrowed earlier
  • We provided extra-curricular activities, including gifted and talented provision, and ensured these were available for and accessed by Pupil Premium children
  • We continued to use and increase the number of targeted key stage 2 pupils undertaking the ‘Better Readers’ Project’ to accelerate reading progress
  • We used 1- to-1 tuition for targeted pupils to accelerate pupil progress in maths
  • We funded an additional experienced English teacher to work in year 6 to instigate individual and small group interventions to ensure all pupil premium children achieved /exceeded their academic targets. The school’s deputy head teacher was deployed to support our more able mathematicians.
  • We funded off-site school visits for all disadvantaged pupils and mutually agreed to fund out of school activities that supported and promoted engagement in their learning which has ensured equality of opportunity, so no child has been discriminated against as a result of financial disadvantage
  • We held pupil progress meetings each half term to review the progress of all children in receipt of FSM/Ever6 and the efficacy of our strategies and interventions, so that we ensured they all remained on track to achieve/exceed their academic targets.

IMPACT – the difference this additional money made to the learning outcomes for children in receipt of Pupil Premium:

  • All children in receipt of funding, including the more able, were targeted for additional educational provision to ensure at least expected and increasingly good progress was achieved by all these children. Our data analysis shows that our strategic decisions on how we spent the Pupil Premium had a positive impact on the achievement of this group of children and that across all classes a rise in progress and attainment for the vast majority of our Premium pupils was secured. Using additional qualified teachers and skilled support staff to work with targeted children across the school ensured we focused on improving the quality of our provision/interventions and thus achievement for our disadvantaged children.
  • Our continued focus on ensuring phonics and early reading skills are being taught well enabled all children to make at least expected/good progress and some to make outstanding progress in their reading. The great majority of children in receipt of funding are achieving age related reading levels and above.
  • Two pupil premium children at the end of key stage 2 gained Level 6 in maths, and a further pupil premium child who achieved highly at Level 5
  • Progress for disadvantaged children in reception was good
  • Gaps have continued to narrow at the end of key stage 2 so that progress in reading, writing and maths and attainment in writing was better for pupil premium children than other children
  • Additional language and family learning support for targeted Pupil Premium/EAL pupils is enabling us to narrow the attainment gap especially in maths and reading as evidenced by our data
  • The vast majority of disadvantaged children participated in extra-curricular and out of school hours learning opportunities.

How we used our Pupil Premium funding for 2013-2014 (£64,699)

Our Pupil Premium for 2013-14 was £64,699.

These are the strategies and interventions we employed over the last year to ensure we made a positive difference to the educational outcomes of our children in receipt of funding:

  • We continued to fund skilled support staff who gave additional language and learning support to children with EAL and/or SEN and who also qualified for free school meals so that their significant needs were met appropriately and achievement improved
  • In foundation stage and key stage 1, we funded additional quality first teaching and timely interventions, lead and managed by additional teachers and a HLTA, to ensure early reading, writing and mathematical skills were secured for all groups of children in receipt of the Premium so that attainment gaps can be narrowed earlier
  • We ensured extra-curricular activities including gifted and talented provision were available and accessed by Premium pupils
  • We continued the ‘Better Readers’ Project’ for targeted key stage 2 Premium pupils
  • We used 1- to-1 tuition for targeted pupils
  • We funded an additional experienced English teacher to work in year 6 to instigate individual and small group interventions to ensure all pupil premium children achieved /exceeded their academic targets. (The school’s deputy head teacher was deployed to support our more able mathematicians.)
  • We held pupil progress meetings each half term to review the progress of all children in receipt of FSM/Ever6 and the efficacy of interventions to date, so that we ensured they all remained on track to achieve/exceed their academic targets.

IMPACT – the difference this additional money made to the learning outcomes for children in receipt of Pupil Premium:

  • All children in receipt of funding were targeted for additional educational provision to ensure at least expected and increasingly good progress was achieved by all these children. Our data analysis shows that our strategic decisions on how we spent the Pupil Premium had a positive impact on the achievement of this group of children and that across all classes a rise in progress and attainment for the vast majority of our Premium pupils was secured. Using additional qualified teachers and skilled support staff to work with targeted children across the school ensured we focused on improving the quality of our provision/interventions and thus achievement for our disadvantaged children.
  • Our continued focus on ensuring phonics and early reading skills are being taught well enabled all children to make at least expected/good progress and some to make outstanding progress in their reading. The great majority of children in receipt of funding are achieving age related reading levels and above.
  • Additional language and family learning support for targeted Pupil Premium/EAL pupils is enabling us to narrow the attainment gap especially in maths and reading as evidenced by our data
  • Disadvantaged children are increasingly participating in extra-curricular and out of school hours learning opportunities.

How we spent our 2012-2013 Pupil Premium

Our Pupil Premium for 2012-13 was £40,800 and all of this money was spent on supporting us in raising standards for this targeted group of children in the following ways:
  • Release of Inclusion lead teacher to work with staff and children three days each week to raise expectations and provide and co-ordinate effective and timely interventions
  • One-to-one tuition
  • ‘Achievement for All’
  • Early years’ phonics and guided reading training
  • Staffing for Better Readers’ Project (key stage 2)
  • Additional teacher support for writing
  • Additional teacher support for maths
  • Lunchtime home-work club
  • In-school additional language and family learning support
  • Gifted and talented extra-curricular provision.

IMPACT: The difference this additional money made to the learning outcomes for children in receipt of Pupil Premium

All children in receipt of funding were targeted for additional educational provision to ensure at least good progress was achieved by all these children. Our data analysis shows that our strategic decisions on how we spent the Pupil Premium had a positive impact on the achievement of this group of children and that across all classes a rise in progress and attainment for the vast majority of our Premium pupils was secured. Releasing our Inclusion lead teacher from the classroom three days each week to work with staff and targeted children across the school ensured we focused on improving provision and thus achievement for FSM/SEN children.

We also involved ourselves in the 'Achievement for All' project , developing closer and more effective links with parents/carers of children who have been identified with special educational needs and in receipt of FSM with the aim again to improve educational outcomes for these children. Our data shows that this intervention too had a positive but more limited impact. We will not be continuing with this project because its impact did not represent good value for money.

Our focus on ensuring phonics and early reading skills are being taught well enabled all children to make at least expected/good progress and some to make outstanding progress in their reading. The great majority of children in receipt of pupil premium are achieving age related reading levels and above.

Additional language and family learning support for targeted Pupil Premium/EAL pupils is enabling us more effectively to narrow the attainment gap, especially in maths and reading, as evidenced by our data.
Pupil premium children who were targeted for gifted and talented provision achieved exceptionally well.

How we spent our 2011-2012 Pupil Premium

Our Pupil Premium for 2011-12 was £15,250 and all of this money was spent on supporting us in raising standards for this targeted group of children in the following ways:
  • One-to-one tuition
  • Early years' phonics training and new resources
  • Better Readers Project (key stage 2)
  • Additional quality first teacher support for writing
  • Additional focussed maths support
  • Lunchtime home-work club
  • In-school additional language and family learning support
  • Gifted and talented extra-curricular provision

IMPACT: The difference this additional money made to the learning outcomes for children in receipt of free school meals

All children in receipt of FSM were targeted for additional educational provision to ensure at least good progress was achieved by all those children. Our data analysis clearly shows that our strategic decisions on how we spent the Pupil Premium had a positive and significant impact on the achievement of this group of children.